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Retired agent and former FBI profiler Dr. Mary Ellen O’Toole, Ph.D., served in the FBI for nearly 28 years. For more than half of that time, she worked in the Bureau’s prestigious Behavioral Analysis Unit (BAU) where she consulted on many of the FBI’s highest profile and most complex cases, including homicides, kidnappings, sexual assaults, predatory behavior, child molestation and other crimes of violence. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Mary Ellen O’Toole, who is recognized as the FBI’s leading expert in “psychopathy,” discusses serial killers and reviews the case of the Green River Killer Gary Ridgway, who was convicted of killing 49 women. Post retirement, Dr. O’Toole is an internationally recognized Forensic Behavioral Consultant and Lecturer. She makes frequent media appearances on major TV news programs and radio affiliates and has been interviewed in prominent newspapers and publications around the country. In 2015, Mary Ellen O’Toole was appointed as the Director of the Forensic Science Program at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Her book Dangerous Instincts: How Gut Feelings Betray Us introduces the right way to assess people for everyday situations in our personal and professional lives, and how to make safer decisions about them and the situations they create for us. You can learn more about Dr. Mary Ellen O’Toole by visiting her website MaryEllenOtoole.com.

 

Supervisory Special Agent (Retired)

Mary Ellen O’Toole

4/ 5/1981 – 1/7/2009

 

Dr. Mary Ellen O'Toole. Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Retired agent Dr. Raymond Batvinis, Ph.D. served in the FBI for twenty-five years. He spent most of his career concentrating on counterintelligence and counterterrorism matters. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Ray Batvinis reviews the history of the FBI’s counterintelligence program and past and current investigations of Russian interference in U. S. policies. During his Bureau career, Ray Batvinis’ assignments included stints at the Washington Field Office and the Intelligence Division’s Training Unit at FBI headquarters. Later he served in the Baltimore Division as a Supervisory Special Agent where he was privileged to supervise espionage investigations. After his retirement, he earned a Ph.D. in American History from The Catholic University of America and currently works a historian and educator specializing in the discipline of counterintelligence as a function of statecraft. He has written two books on the history of the FBI’s counterintelligence program. The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence, examines the turbulent early years of the Bureau’s counterintelligence evolution and includes examples of past Russian interference. His latest book provides details about former Director J. Edgar Hoover and FBI Counterespionage during World War II. In addition to writing and researching, Dr. Batvinis operates FBIstudies.com, a website focused on the study of the FBI and other counterintelligence issues.

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Retired agent Juan Jackson served with the FBI for 24 years. Most of his Bureau career were spent as an undercover agent working dangerous assignments in New York, Miami, Atlanta and cities throughout the country. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Juan Jackson is interviewed about his long term undercover role as “J. J.” a drug kingpin in the FBI Group I undercover case – Operation Shattered Shield. Juan, as his alter ego J. J., hired corrupt members of the New Orleans Police Department to protect his large-scale cocaine operation. The dirty police officers, maintained around-the-clock guard duty at the warehouse where the drugs were stored. During the investigation, monitors overheard officers repeatedly threatening violence against J. J. and his couriers. The case ended abruptly when the FBI wiretap also revealed that one of the officers, Len Davis, had ordered a hit-man to murder a woman who had filed a police brutality complaint against him. In addition to murder, Davis, his partner Sammie Williams and more than 20 other officers were convicted of extorting bribes and offering protection to a drug dealer. Juan Jackson received the New Orleans Police Department’s Medal of Valor for his contributions to Operation Shattered Shield. Post retirement, Juan Jackson has worked as director of security for several NBA teams. Currently, he is Director of Team Security for the Philadelphia 76ers.

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Show Notes:

Retired agent Juan Jackson served with the FBI for 24 years. Most of his Bureau career were spent as an undercover agent working dangerous assignments in New York, Miami, Atlanta and cities throughout the country. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Juan Jackson is interviewed about his long term undercover role as “J. J.” a drug kingpin in the FBI Group I undercover case – Operation Shattered Shield. Juan, as his alter ego J. J., hired corrupt members of the New Orleans Police Department to protect his large-scale cocaine operation. The dirty police officers, maintained around-the-clock guard duty at the warehouse where the drugs were stored. During the investigation, monitors overheard officers repeatedly threatening violence against J. J. and his couriers. The case ended abruptly when the FBI wiretap also revealed that one of the officers, Len Davis, had ordered a hit-man to murder a woman who had filed a police brutality complaint against him. In addition to murder, Davis, his partner Sammie Williams and more than 20 other officers were convicted of extorting bribes and offering protection to a drug dealer. Juan Jackson received the New Orleans Police Department’s Medal of Valor for his contributions to Operation Shattered Shield. Post retirement, Juan Jackson has worked as director of security for several NBA teams. Currently, he is Director of Team Security for the Philadelphia 76ers.

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Retired agent Greg Stejskal served with the FBI for 31 years. He was assigned to the Detroit Division, where, for the most part, he worked out of the Ann Arbor Resident Agency. He was the Senior Resident Agent in the RA for the last ten years of his career prior to retirement. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Stejskal reviews the investigation of a massive marijuana criminal enterprise. Initially a lead from the Indianapolis Division seeking assistance with a case involving a mother, Linda Leary, and her two sons, Paul and Richard Heilbrunn, who were charged with operating a marijuana smuggling and distribution enterprise, Greg Stejskal was assigned to identified and locate a co-conspirator thought to be living in the Ann Arbor, Michigan area. Only identified as “The Joker” in the 136-page federal indictment, the unknown subject had been charged with being a distributor for the Heilbrunn family marijuana operation. According to the indictment, the drug ring operated from 1975 to 1985 and it would prove to be the biggest marijuana ring ever prosecuted in the United States. After a patient but persistent investigation, Stejskal determined that James Hill was the man he was looking for, the Joker. Hill was sentenced to twenty years in jail for his role in the Ann Arbor operation of the marijuana criminal enterprise. Post retirement, Greg Stejskal is active in community service. He is also a regular contributor to TickleTheWire.Com, a website featuring federal law enforcement news from around the country. Stejskal’s article about his search for the Joker, Hunting For The Joker, is posted on the site.

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Retired agent Mike Leyden served 26 years with the FBI. Leyden, who has a law degree from Villanova University, was assigned to the Jacksonville Division, Pensacola Residency Agency and the Detroit Division, where he worked bank robberies, kidnappings, and fugitive matters. When transferred to the Philadelphia Division, Leyden helped set up and was the supervisor of the Special Operations Group based on a concept initially established in the Detroit Division. He was later appointed as the supervisor of the Newtown Square Resident Agency. To avoid an unwanted transfer to FBIHQ, Leyden stepped down and was placed on the Organized Crime Squad to work cases targeting the Philly mob. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Leyden is interviewed about an extortion case that resulted in the conviction of Philly mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo Sr., Philadelphia City Councilman Leland Beloff, and Beloff’s administrative assistant, Robert Rego for attempting to extort $1 million from Willard Rouse, a Philadelphia developer. During the investigation, two “made men,” Nicholas Caramandi and Thomas DelGiorno, became government witnesses and their testimony eventually led to indictment and conviction of entire hierarchy of the Scarfo Family. After retirement, Mike Leyden became the Vice President of Corporate Security and Surveillance for Caesars Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City. Currently, he still occasionally accepts private investigation assignments.

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Retired agent Gina Davis served 25 years with the FBI. She began her Bureau career on a Violent Crimes and Drug Trafficking Crimes Squad in Albany, New York. After a long term undercover assignment in the Baltimore Division, Gina Davis received a permanent transfer and continued to investigate drug and violent crimes, in addition to starting and serving as the acting supervisor of a Safe Streets Task Force operating out of Calverton, Maryland office. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Gina and Maryland State Trooper and homicide detective Ted Jones, a 10-year taskforce member, are interviewed about how the team solved a cold case murder of the execution-style shooting of three young women. The women’s bodies were left in a secluded area off a rural route in Laurel, Maryland. Because the location was on federal land, the case was initially investigated by the U.S. Park Police and later assigned to the Safe Streets Taskforce. The taskforce was able to gather the evidence needed to charge the three men responsible for the murders. In 1999, Davis was promoted to a supervisory position at FBI Headquarters, managing FBI personnel stationed at Legal Attaches in U.S. embassies in countries around the world.  She was promoted again in 2001 and was assigned to the Seattle Division, Tacoma Resident Agency where she managed all investigative programs in the three offices under her purview. Gina Davis initiated both a Safe Streets Task Force and a Joint Terrorism Task Force during her six-year tenure in Tacoma. Her last assignment was in the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division (CID) where she served as Chief of Staff for the Assistant Director.

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