Retired agent John Mindermann served in the FBI for 20 years. During his career, he was a firearms and defensive tactics instructor, and leader of the first Washington Field Office SWAT Team. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, he reviews his assignment on C-2, the Miscellaneous Crimes Squad assigned to the Watergate investigation. He reveals little-known facts about the case, including the circumstances leading to the interview of a key witness and the FBI shutdown of the Presidential business offices in the White House. Later in his career, he was assigned to the Behavioral Science Unit in Quantico, Virginia, where  he specialized in violence avoidance, and created and taught Crisis Intervention and Police Stress programs. Prior to retiring, he transferred back to his hometown, San Francisco, where he supervised an Organized Crime and Narcotics Squad. Joh Mindermann is the author of In Pursuit: From the Streets of San Francisco to Watergate,  a gripping tale of a defining moment in American history—the Watergate scandal—told for the first time by the FBI agent who was coincidentally on weekend duty when the burglary occurred.

 

Supervisory Special Agent (Retired)

John Mindermann

3/4/1968 – 5/1/1988

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Retired agent Alfred Finch served in the FBI for 22 years. During his career, he was assigned to a variety of investigative and executive positions handling public corruption, kidnapping, extortion, bank robbery, and terrorism cases. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Al Finch reviews his investigation of a 1988 plane crash that took the lives of Pakistani President Zia, a U.S. Ambassador, and 28 others. Al Finch found himself involved in international intrigue and misinformation when possible evidence that the Pakistani C-130 crash was an accident was suppressed, and the unproven theory that the cause was a terrorist event was put forward instead. Al Finch finished his career as the Legal Attaché to Cairo and later as a Deputy Chief with the U.S. National Central Bureau of Interpol. Upon retiring from the FBI, he was a contract employee with the FBI assigned to the National Counter Terrorism Center. He later served as Director of Security for the Middle East Broadcasting Networks, in Springfield, Virginia where he set up personnel security apparatus for all radio and television employees and the physical plants that housed them. He is  currently a contract employee with the Voice of America.

 

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Retired agent Ed Mireles served in the FBI for 25 years. During his career, he worked as a street agent, supervisor and manager in a wide range of investigative and administrative areas, as well as an undercover agent in hundreds of high level, high-risk narcotics, criminal and national security investigations. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, he reviews the April 11, 1986, fatal FBI Miami shootout where, during the pursuit of two extremely dangerous criminals, two special agents were killed, and several others, including Ed Mireles, were wounded. Although severely injured, Ed Mireles fired his shotgun one-handed to prevent the suspects from escaping, then charged the suspects, fatally wounding both. His heroic actions prevented further injury to his fellow Agents and innocent citizens. He has received numerous awards and commendations honoring him for his heroism and bravery that day. After retiring from the Bureau, Ed Mireles, a former Marine, worked as a defense contractor in Iraq as a law enforcement professional and adviser to the Iraqi Police, including one year embedded (in uniform) with the Marines. He also worked with the U.S. Department of State in helping to train police in Mexico and Belize. He is the author of  FBI Miami Firefight: Five Minutes that Changed the Bureau his story of survival and the fight to save the lives of his brother agents on that fateful day. The true crime book is available exclusively on his website EdMireles.com.

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Retired agent Ed Mireles served in the FBI for 25 years. During his career, he worked as a street agent, supervisor and manager in a wide range of investigative and administrative areas, as well as an undercover agent in hundreds of high level, high-risk narcotics, criminal and national security investigations. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, he reviews the April 11, 1986, fatal FBI Miami shootout where, during the pursuit of two extremely dangerous criminals, two special agents were killed, and several others, including Ed Mireles, were wounded. Although severely injured, Ed Mireles fired his shotgun one handed to prevent the suspects from escaping, then charged the suspects, fatally wounding both. His heroic actions prevented further injury to his fellow Agents and innocent citizens. He has received numerous awards and commendations honoring him for his heroism and bravery that day. After retiring from the Bureau, Ed Mireles, a former Marine, worked as a defense contractor in Iraq as a law enforcement professional and adviser to the Iraqi Police, including one year embedded (in uniform) with the Marines. He also worked with the U.S. Department of State in helping to train police in Mexico and Belize. He is the author of  FBI Miami Firefight: Five Minutes that Changed the Bureau his story of survival and the fight to save the lives of his brother agents on that fateful day. The true crime book is available exclusively on his website EdMireles.com.

 

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Retired agent Kevin Rust served 29 years with the FBI. He spent a majority of his career in Mississippi in resident agencies out of the Jackson Division, including 13 years in a one person office. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Kevin Rust reviews his investigation of a rural police officer charged and convicted of deprivation of rights under color of law violations, in connection with the blackjack beating of a Jake Gibbs, an elderly black man in police custody. Gibbs sustained two broken ribs as the result of the use of excessive force incident. During his Bureau career, Kevin Rust also had assignments in Chicago, Budapest, FBI Headquarters and Quantico. He was a crisis negotiator who responded to many incidents both domestically and internationally and taught negotiation concepts to hundreds of state, local and international officers. Kevin Rust, who prior to entering the FBI was a CPA with Price Waterhouse, currently works as a contractor for the FBI’s International Corruption Unit tracing money flows and identifying for seizure assets that were purchased with money stolen by foreign kleptocrats.

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Retired agent Dan Reilly served with the FBI for 30 years, six as a photographer and technician in the FBI Laboratory and twenty-four as a Special Agent. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Dan Reilly reviews the case of con-man and rare documents thief, Charles Merrill Mount, a celebrated Portrait artist and art historian, who stole hundreds of historical manuscripts from the National Archives and the Library of Congress, including Civil War documents and three letters written by Abraham Lincoln. During his career, he worked on a variety of criminal cases, including Interstate Transportation of Stolen Property, property crimes, and helped start the FBI’s Safe Streets Task Force Program investigating violent drug gangs. Dan Reilly led the Evidence Response Team (ERT) at the Washington Field Office and provided extensive experience and training to others on crime scene examination. After his retirement from the FBI, Dan Reilly worked as a private consulting analyst with the High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) task force operations in the Mid-Atlantic region. Dan Reilly is currently an adjunct faculty member at George Mason University in the Criminology, Law and Society Department.

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Scott Decker served 22 years in the FBI. Early in his Bureau career, Decker, who has a doctorate in Human Genetics, joined the Bureau’s fledgling Hazardous Materials Response Unit in Quantico. On September 12, 2001, he led a team of FBI hazmat specialists to Ground Zero in New York City. Three weeks later, the country came under attack again, this time from anthrax. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Scott Decker reviews working on and later managing the “science squad” of the newly formed Amerithrax Task Force. The task force’s mission was to identify and apprehend the person responsible for the mailings of anthrax that killed five people and permanently injured nearly two dozen more. Decker coordinated the early genetics and DNA forensics of the investigation. He went on to supervise a squad of agents, all with advanced science degrees, as they coordinated the forensics aspect of the case. Their work charted new ground and established the discipline of Microbial Forensics. In 2009, he and his team received the FBI Director’s Award for Outstanding Scientific Advancement. Scott Decker is the author of Recounting the Anthrax Attacks: Terror, the Amerithrax Task Force, and the Evolution of Forensics in the FBI, in which he was able to write with authority on the events that took place during the anthrax investigation, many of which have never before been publicized. You can learn more about Scott Decker and his non-fiction book on his website rscottdecker.com.

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