Retired agent Michael E. Anderson served with the FBI for 28 years. He was assigned to the San Antonio Division, Austin Resident Agency and as a supervisor at FBI Headquarters, prior to reporting to Houston as a White Collar Crime supervisor managing highly complex Financial Crimes and Intellectual Property Rights investigations. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Michael E. Anderson reviews the Enron Investigation, the largest and most complex White Collar Crime case in FBI history, for which he received the Attorney General’s Award for Exceptional Service. Subsequently, he was promoted to Assistant Special Agent in Charge (ASAC) and initially oversaw the entire Criminal Program. He also served as the FBI Houston Chief Policy and Compliance Officer for over six years. Michael E. Anderson is a Certified Fraud Examiner who has spoken extensively about Enron and ethics to universities, private groups and companies around the country. He can be contacted via his LinkedIn profile.

 

Assistant Special Agent in Charge (Retired)

Michael E. Anderson

5/21/1989 – 11/30/2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“While the Enron culture encouraged intelligence, creativity, and risk taking, it also tolerated in-fighting, backstabbing, manipulation, vanity, and greed.”

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Retired agent Stephen Heaney served in the FBI for more than 25 years. His entire career was spent at the Philadelphia Division working, primarily, major thefts and violent crimes. In the episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Steve Heaney reviews a tow truck ambush case where two tow-truck operators hauling confiscated cars for the FBI as part of a drug investigation were ambushed at a busy Center City intersection by gunmen attempting to steal the cars back. During Steve’s career, he served as a firearms instructor and was a SWAT team leader. For ten years, he was the FBI liaison  was the FBI liaison with the Federal Detention Center in Philadelphia. He was later appointed as the Violent Crime Squad supervisor and then the Health Care Fraud Squad supervisor. He was also the Crisis Management and SWAT Team Coordinator.

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Retired agent Jeff Rinek served in the FBI for 30 years, two years as a support employee and 28 as a Special Agent. During his career, he primarily investigated cases of missing and murdered children. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Jeff Rinek reviews how he obtained a confession from serial killer Cary Stayner, responsible for the Yosemite Park Murders, the brutal slayings of two women and two teenage girls. He also discusses the mental toll working child predator and murder cases had on him, and how his family helped him cope with case related  PTSD and attempted suicide. While assigned to the Sacramento office of the FBI, Jeff Rinek assisted police and sheriffs departments’ throughout Northern California in active and cold-case investigations involving missing children, child kidnappings, and the abuse, exploitation, and murder of children. He also served as a certified profiler for the National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime. In 2003, he was named Investigator of the Year by the California Sexual Assault Investigators Association, and in 2006, received an Award for Excellence from the International Homicide Investigators Association. He was also a member of the SWAT team and, and a co-pilot in the Sacramento Office’s aviation squad. He has been featured on numerous TV documentary crime shows, including A&E’s American Justice, TruTV’s Crime Stories, and Investigation Discovery’s Real Detective. Jeff Rinek is the author of In the Name of the Children: An FBI Agent’s Relentless Pursuit of the Nation’s Worst Predators, his personal account of child predator and murder investigations. Each chapter is dedicated to the victims of the cases he worked, including a chapter for his wife and sons.

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Retired agent Jeff Rinek served in the FBI for 30 years, two years as a support employee and 28 as a Special Agent. During his career, he primarily investigated cases of missing and murdered children. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Jeff Rinek reviews how he obtained a confession from serial killer Cary Stayner, responsible for the Yosemite Park Murders, the brutal slayings of two women and two teenage girls. He also discusses the mental toll working child predator and murder cases had on him, and how his family helped him cope with case related  PTSD and attempted suicide. While assigned to the Sacramento office of the FBI, Jeff Rinek assisted police and sheriffs departments’ throughout Northern California in active and cold-case investigations involving missing children, child kidnappings, and the abuse, exploitation, and murder of children. He also served as a certified profiler for the National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime. In 2003, he was named Investigator of the Year by the California Sexual Assault Investigators Association, and in 2006, received an Award for Excellence from the International Homicide Investigators Association. He was also a member of the SWAT team and, and a co-pilot in the Sacramento Office’s aviation squad. He has been featured on numerous TV documentary crime shows, including A&E’s American Justice, TruTV’s Crime Stories, and Investigation Discovery’s Real Detective. Jeff Rinek is the author of In the Name of the Children: An FBI Agent’s Relentless Pursuit of the Nation’s Worst Predators, his personal account of child predator and murder investigations. Each chapter is dedicated to the victims of the cases he worked, including a chapter for his wife and sons.

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Retired agent Keith Tolhurst served in the FBI for 24 years. During his career, he investigated kidnappings, interstate shipment theft, civil rights, hate crimes, gangs, domestic terrorism, murder, sex crimes, bank robberies, and fugitives. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, he reviews the case of Grand Canyon prison escapee Danny Ray Horning, who led the FBI and law enforcement partners on the largest fugitive manhunt in Arizona. The investigation lasted 54 days and used specially trained tracking dogs. The case and Keith Tolhurst have been featured on the TV shows Discovery ID FBI: Criminal Pursuit and the FBI Files.  As the FBI Phoenix Division’s Senior SWAT team leader and SWAT Coordinator for the entire state of Arizona, Keith Tolhurst was involved in every aspect of crisis management to include: command post procedures, critical infrastructure threats, dignitary protection, special events, security assessments, and hostage situations. Keith was nominated for the medal of bravery for operations outside of the United States. He was a Principle Firearms and Tactical Instructor and designated as an FBI Master Police Instructor, providing firearms and tactics training around the world to thousands of students from international, military, state, local and tribal police agencies. Since his retirement from the FBI, Keith has been employed as an independent contractor for the Bureau for the past seven years, providing classified and unclassified instruction to FBI agents related to advanced human intelligence. He is the founder of Tolhurst International, LLC a licensed Private Investigations firm that also provides security consultants, customizable training courses, and guest speaker services.

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JERRI WILLIAMS iTUNES

Retired Agent Vincent McNally served in the FBI for 31 years. He was initially hired as a clerical employee. During his agent career, he conducted and led investigations in general criminal violations, espionage, terrorism, white-collar crime, organized crime, and drug violations. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Vince McNally reviews the case of a mysterious airplane cargo theft of $1 million of negotiable securities stolen from an American Airlines flight traveling between New York and Los Angeles. Later in his career, Vince McNally became an instructor in Crisis (Hostage) Negotiations and Program Manager for the FBI’s Critical Incident Stress Management teams at the FBI Academy. Vince retired after serving as Unit Chief of the Employee Assistance Unit at FBI Headquarters. Currently, Vince McNally serves on the Board of Scientific & Professional Advisors of the American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress (National Center for Crisis Management). He is a Compassion Fatigue Specialist, Board Certified in Acute Traumatic Stress Management, and Board Certified in Emergency Crisis Response. He is also a Certified Employee Assistance Professional (CEAP). Vince and I continue our conversation from Episode 36 about the stress and trauma experienced by first responders that results in a higher incidence of first responder suicide. Here’s his 10 Point Suicide Reduction Program. He can be contacted via his LinkedIn profile, where he regularly posts articles on critical incidents, trauma, stress, and first responder suicide.

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Retired agent J.J. Klaver served in the FBI for 25 years. He was initially assigned to the Indianapolis Division for eight years before being transferred to the Philadelphia Division. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, J.J. Klaver reviews his duties as a Technically Trained Agent (TTA) on the Technical Operations Squad, collecting evidence and intelligence through the use of lawfully authorized electronic surveillance, and reviews how audio and video monitoring was utilized in the Fort Dix Six terror plot case. Later in his career, J.J. Klaver was appointed as the Division’s Media Relations Coordinator and spokesperson, and the supervisor of both the Executive Staff Services Squad and Technical Operations Squad. Upon his retirement, J.J. worked for Barclays Bank in New York City as a Vice President in Compliance, Conduct Oversight. Recently, J.J. Klaver, who has a Doctorate degree in Organization and Management, started his own consulting firm, Klaver Consulting Associates.

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