Retired agent Gary Noesner served in the FBI for more than 30 years, four as a support employee and 26 as a special agent. During his Bureau career he was an investigator, instructor, and hostage negotiator. A significant focus of his career was directed toward investigating and negotiating numerous crisis incidents covering prison riots, right-wing militia standoffs, religious zealot sieges, terrorist embassy takeovers, airplane hijackings, and over 120 overseas kidnapping cases involving American citizens. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Gary Noesner reviews the importance of crisis negotiations and stalling for time and how these concepts were used during the Montana Freeman incident. When he retired he was the Chief of the FBI’s Crisis Negotiation Unit, Critical Incident Response Group, the first person to hold that position. He continues to consult independently and speaks at law enforcement conferences and corporate gatherings around the world. He has appeared on numerous television news programs and documentaries and has been interviewed in major publications addressing hostage negotiation, terrorism, and kidnapping. He has written a book about his career, Stalling for Time: My Life as an FBI Hostage Negotiator. The book serves as the basis for a six part mini-series on the 1993 Waco Siege incident that will air on the Paramount Network in January 2018. Gary can be contacted for presentations and speeches via his website.

 

Unit Chief (Retired)

Gary Noesner

10/30/1972 – 1/3/2003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Retired agent Tym Burkey served 20 years with the FBI. While in the Cincinnati Division at the Dayton Resident Agency, he worked violent crime and domestic terrorism matters and was assigned a case targeting the Aryan Nations, which at the time was considered to be the most dangerous white supremacist group in the United States. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Tym Burkey reviews how his informant Dave Hall infiltrated the violent neo-Nazi organization. The intelligence gathered by Hall led to the disruption and dismantling of the Aryan Nations’ leadership. Later in his career, Tym Burkey began working counterintelligence investigations and was transferred to the Albuquerque Division where he was assigned to the Sandia National Laboratories and supervised the Albuquerque Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF). After retiring from the FBI, Tym Burkey co-wrote with Dave Hall a narrative account of their Aryan Nations case. Their book, Into the Devil’s Den: How an FBI Informant Got Inside the Aryan Nations and a Special Agent Got Him Out Alive, is a true-life thriller and a testament to bravery, dedication, and friendship. It’s also a timely reminder that America’s homegrown terrorists can be just as deadly as those from overseas.

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Retired agent Jon Hersley served in the FBI for 30 years and retired agent Larry Tongate served for 29 years. They were case agents assigned to the nation-wide investigation of the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review with Jerri Williams we learn more about the 168 victims—including 19 children—and the more than 500 people injured from the bombing. The warped ideology that motivated Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols to blow up the Murrah building is also reviewed. Jon Hersley was assigned to the Oklahoma City Division. Larry Tongate was in the Bureau’s Kansas City Office. The bomb blast also destroyed the entire north side of the nine-story concrete and granite Murrah building, incinerated nearby cars, and damaged more than 300 buildings. The OKBOMB investigation, as it became known, is the United States’ deadliest act of homegrown terrorism.  After being tried and convicted of the crime, McVeigh was executed on June 11, 2001 and Nichols was sentenced to life in prison. A third individual, Michael Fortier was sentenced to 12 years in prison for failing to report the planned attack and for lying to the FBI. In their book—Simple Truths: The Real Story of the Oklahoma City Bombing Investigation—Hersley and Tongate and their co-author Bob Burke, assembled a chronological review of the initial events and of the evidence gathered in the case against McVeigh, Nichols and Fortier.

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Retired agent Jon Hersley served in the FBI for 30 years and retired agent Larry Tongate served for 29 years. They were case agents assigned to the nation-wide investigation of the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review with Jerri Williams they are interviewed about the fast-moving search to identify, capture and charge the persons responsible. Jon Hersley was assigned to the Oklahoma City Division. Larry Tongate was in the Bureau’s Kansas City Office. The bomb blast caused the death of 168 innocent people—including 19 children and injured more than 500 people. It also destroyed the entire north side of the nine-story concrete and granite Murrah building, incinerated nearby cars, and damaged more than 300 buildings. The OKBOMB investigation, as it became known, is the United States’ deadliest act of homegrown terrorism.  After being tried and convicted of the crime, Timothy McVeigh was executed on June 11, 2001 and Terry Nichols was sentenced to life in prison. A third individual, Michael Fortier was sentenced to 12 years in prison for failing to report the planned attack and for lying to the FBI. In their book—Simple Truths: The Real Story of the Oklahoma City Bombing Investigation—Hersley and Tongate and their co-author Bob Burke, assembled a chronological review of the initial events and of the evidence gathered in the case against McVeigh, Nichols and Fortier.

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Retired agent Rick Hahn served 32 years with the FBI, six years as a clerical employee and 26 as a special agent. Throughout his entire career he was involved in terrorism cases, either as a field investigator or as a forensic specialist in explosives. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review with Jerri Williams, Hahn is interviewed about the extensive investigation of the domestic terrorist group known as the FALN—Fuerzas Armadas de Liberacion Nacional or Armed Forces of National Liberation—an extremist organization advocating for Puerto Rican independence through acts of violence. The group, active in the 1970s and early 1980s, is credited with committing more than 100 bombings that caused several deaths, multiple injuries, and millions of dollars in damage. Hahn also talks about the formation of the first official Joint Terrorism Taskforces (JTTF) in New York and Chicago. He believes that the FALN was and still is American’s most prolific domestic terrorism organization. In 1984, United States Attorney General William French Smith awarded Rick Hahn with the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service for his efforts in disrupting and dismantling the FALN. A documentary about the investigation will be released later in the year. The film is based on a non-fiction manuscript written by Rick Hahn.

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Retired agent Max Noel served nearly 31 years with the FBI. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review with Jerri Williams, Noel is interviewed about the Unabomber Terrorist Ted Kaczynski case. For 15 years, multiple agencies, including the FBI, AFT, the Postal Inspection Service and numerous state and local police departments, worked mostly independently to identified and arrest the person responsible for setting off 16 bombs throughout the United States that killed three and seriously maimed and injured 23 victims. Noel, who was planning to retire just prior to being hand-picked for the assignment, was selected as the investigative squad supervisor for a new task force created by then Attorney General Janet Reno and FBI Director Louie Freeh. FBI management supported Noel and his multi-agency team with a strategy to manage the massive manpower and paper intensive major investigation—code-named Unabomber— that had previously frustrated and overwhelmed all involved. Ted Kaczynski name was among the huge list of potential suspects. As luck would have it, the Unabomber’s anonymity was finally cracked when Kaczynski released his infamous manifesto. Noel and other members of the task force received the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguish Service for their efforts. Noel, along with Special Agent in Charge (SAC) Jim Freeman and Assistant Special Agent in Charge (ASAC) Terry D. Turchie, wrote a book, Unabomber: How the FBI Broke Its Own Rules to Capture the Terrorist Ted Kaczynski, about how, after almost 17 years, they finally identified, captured, and convicted the notorious Unabomber.

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Retired agent Max Noel served nearly 31 years with the FBI. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review with Jerri Williams, Noel is interviewed about the Unabomber Terrorist Ted Kaczynski case. For 15 years, multiple agencies, including the FBI, AFT, the Postal Inspection Service and numerous state and local police departments, worked mostly independently to identified and arrest the person responsible for setting off 16 bombs throughout the United States that killed three and seriously maimed and injured 23 victims. Noel, who was planning to retire just prior to being hand-picked for the assignment, was selected as the investigative squad supervisor for a new task force created by then Attorney General Janet Reno and FBI Director Louie Freeh. FBI management supported Noel and his multi-agency team with a strategy to manage the massive manpower and paper intensive major investigation—code-named Unabomber— that had previously frustrated and overwhelmed all involved. Ted Kaczynski name was among the huge list of potential suspects. As luck would have it, the Unabomber’s anonymity was finally cracked when Kaczynski released his infamous manifesto. Noel and other members of the task force received the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguish Service for their efforts. Noel, along with Special Agent in Charge (SAC) Jim Freeman and Assistant Special Agent in Charge (ASAC) Terry D. Turchie, wrote a book, Unabomber: How the FBI Broke Its Own Rules to Capture the Terrorist Ted Kaczynski, about how, after almost 17 years, they finally identified, captured, and convicted the notorious Unabomber.

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