In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, retired agents Bob Clifford and Kevin Foust review their international terrorism investigation of the hijacking of Egypt Air Flight 648 during an international trip from Athens, Greece to Cairo, Egypt, on November 23, 1985. The plane was hijacked in Malta by members of the terrorist organization, Abu Nidal. The hijackers began systematically shooting Israeli and American passengers. A rescue attempt by Egyptian commandoes resulted in dozens of deaths, making the hijacking of Flight 648 one of the deadliest such incidents in history. Sixty-one of the 95 passengers and crew died, as did two of the three hijackers.

Omar Mohammed Ali Rezaq was the only member of the terrorist team that survived the rescue attempt. Rezaq was tried in a Maltese court and sentenced to the maximum 25 years imprisonment, but when he was released after serving seven years, Clifford and Foust were determined to bring him to justice in a U.S. court. Clifford and Foust, via sensitive diplomatic negotiations with the leaders of several different African nations, were able to take Rezaq into custody in Lagos, Nigeria in July 1993 and transport him back to the United States to stand trial. He was sentenced to life in prison and is currently being held at the United States Penitentiary in Marion, Illinois.

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In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, retired agents Bob Clifford and Kevin Foust review their international terrorism investigation of the hijacking of Egypt Air Flight 648 during an international trip from Athens, Greece to Cairo, Egypt, on November 23, 1985. The plane was hijacked in Malta by members of the terrorist organization, Abu Nidal. The hijackers began systematically shooting Israeli and American passengers. A rescue attempt by Egyptian commandoes resulted in dozens of deaths, making the hijacking of Flight 648 one of the deadliest such incidents in history. Sixty-one of the 95 passengers and crew died, as did two of the three hijackers.

Omar Mohammed Ali Rezaq was the only member of the terrorist team that survived the rescue attempt. Rezaq was tried in a Maltese court and sentenced to the maximum 25 years imprisonment, but when he was released after serving seven years, Clifford and Foust were determined to bring him to justice in a U.S. court. Clifford and Foust, via sensitive diplomatic negotiations with the leaders of several different African nations, were able to take Rezaq into custody in Lagos, Nigeria in July 1993 and transport him back to the United States to stand trial. He was sentenced to life in prison and is currently being held at the United States Penitentiary in Marion, Illinois.

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Retired agent Eugene Casey served 21 years with the FBI. As a special agent, he used skills acquired from his prior employment as a compliance officer at Wall Street investment firms to work white-collar crime matters, drug money laundering, food stamp benefit fraud, and terrorist financing investigations. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Eugene Casey reviews a series of interviews he conducted with Ilich Ramirez Sanchez, known worldwide as Carlos the Jackal, the inventor of modern-day terrorism. Before Osama Bin Laden, Carlos the Jackal was the world’s most famous terrorist. At the time that these debriefings, Eugene Casey was serving as Assistant Legal Attaché for the FBI in Paris, France. During his career, Casey received several awards from the Department of Justice including one for spearheading the Salt Lake Olympic Bribery investigation. He also served as the supervisor of the Joint Task Force on Terrorist Finance in Saudi Arabia and was the Unit Chief for the Eurasian Organized Crime Unit of the Criminal Investigative Division. His last Bureau assignment before retiring earlier this year was as an instructor at the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia teaching Interviewing and Interrogation Skills.

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Retired agent Kevin Miles served nearly 23 years with the FBI. As the FBI’s first officially assigned full-time Special Agent bomb technician (SABT), he spent more than 17 years acquiring extensive experience in the field of improvised explosive devices and post-blast investigations. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Kevin Miles reviews the duties of a post-blast bomb technician processing and investigating explosive crime scenes, the bombing of Khobar Towers, Saudi Arabia in 1996, and the Maldives Al-Qaeda bombing in 2007. Kevin Miles is a past Executive Director of the International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators. He has travelled to 65 countries and 48 states, including multiple deployments to high threat areas such as Afghanistan and Pakistan, and has taught more than 9,000 students from all over the world on the intricacies involved with bombing investigations. In 2010, he was named as an FBI Master Special Agent Bomb Technician. He has published numerous articles and research papers on the topics above and has received numerous awards for his service to the first responder community. Currently, he is a lecturer at Eastern Kentucky University’s School of Safety, Security, and Emergency Management.

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Retired agent Gary Noesner served in the FBI for more than 30 years, four as a support employee and 26 as a special agent. During his Bureau career he was an investigator, instructor, and hostage negotiator. A significant focus of his career was directed toward investigating and negotiating numerous crisis incidents covering prison riots, right-wing militia standoffs, religious zealot sieges, terrorist embassy takeovers, airplane hijackings, and over 120 overseas kidnapping cases involving American citizens. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Gary Noesner reviews the importance of crisis negotiations and stalling for time and how these concepts were used during the Montana Freeman incident. When he retired he was the Chief of the FBI’s Crisis Negotiation Unit, Critical Incident Response Group, the first person to hold that position. He continues to consult independently and speaks at law enforcement conferences and corporate gatherings around the world. He has appeared on numerous television news programs and documentaries and has been interviewed in major publications addressing hostage negotiation, terrorism, and kidnapping. He has written a book about his career, Stalling for Time: My Life as an FBI Hostage Negotiator. The book serves as the basis for a six part mini-series on the 1993 Waco Siege incident that will air on the Paramount Network in January 2018. Gary can be contacted for presentations and speeches via his website.

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Retired agent Tym Burkey served 20 years with the FBI. While in the Cincinnati Division at the Dayton Resident Agency, he worked violent crime and domestic terrorism matters and was assigned a case targeting the Aryan Nations, which at the time was considered to be the most dangerous white supremacist group in the United States. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Tym Burkey reviews how his informant Dave Hall infiltrated the violent neo-Nazi organization. The intelligence gathered by Hall led to the disruption and dismantling of the Aryan Nations’ leadership. Later in his career, Tym Burkey began working counterintelligence investigations and was transferred to the Albuquerque Division where he was assigned to the Sandia National Laboratories and supervised the Albuquerque Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF). After retiring from the FBI, Tym Burkey co-wrote with Dave Hall a narrative account of their Aryan Nations case. Their book, Into the Devil’s Den: How an FBI Informant Got Inside the Aryan Nations and a Special Agent Got Him Out Alive, is a true-life thriller and a testament to bravery, dedication, and friendship. It’s also a timely reminder that America’s homegrown terrorists can be just as deadly as those from overseas.

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Retired agent Jon Hersley served in the FBI for 30 years and retired agent Larry Tongate served for 29 years. They were case agents assigned to the nation-wide investigation of the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review with Jerri Williams we learn more about the 168 victims—including 19 children—and the more than 500 people injured from the bombing. The warped ideology that motivated Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols to blow up the Murrah building is also reviewed. Jon Hersley was assigned to the Oklahoma City Division. Larry Tongate was in the Bureau’s Kansas City Office. The bomb blast also destroyed the entire north side of the nine-story concrete and granite Murrah building, incinerated nearby cars, and damaged more than 300 buildings. The OKBOMB investigation, as it became known, is the United States’ deadliest act of homegrown terrorism.  After being tried and convicted of the crime, McVeigh was executed on June 11, 2001 and Nichols was sentenced to life in prison. A third individual, Michael Fortier was sentenced to 12 years in prison for failing to report the planned attack and for lying to the FBI. In their book—Simple Truths: The Real Story of the Oklahoma City Bombing Investigation—Hersley and Tongate and their co-author Bob Burke, assembled a chronological review of the initial events and of the evidence gathered in the case against McVeigh, Nichols and Fortier.

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