Retired agent Michael E. Anderson served with the FBI for 28 years. He was assigned to the San Antonio Division, Austin Resident Agency and as a supervisor at FBI Headquarters, prior to reporting to Houston as a White Collar Crime supervisor managing highly complex Financial Crimes and Intellectual Property Rights investigations. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Michael E. Anderson reviews the Enron Investigation, the largest and most complex White Collar Crime case in FBI history, for which he received the Attorney General’s Award for Exceptional Service. Subsequently, he was promoted to Assistant Special Agent in Charge (ASAC) and initially oversaw the entire Criminal Program. He also served as the FBI Houston Chief Policy and Compliance Officer for over six years. Michael E. Anderson is a Certified Fraud Examiner who has spoken extensively about Enron and ethics to universities, private groups and companies around the country. He can be contacted via his LinkedIn profile.

 

Assistant Special Agent in Charge (Retired)

Michael E. Anderson

5/21/1989 – 11/30/2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“While the Enron culture encouraged intelligence, creativity, and risk taking, it also tolerated in-fighting, backstabbing, manipulation, vanity, and greed.”

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Retired agent Jerri Williams served in the FBI for 26 years. During most of her Bureau career, she worked major economic fraud investigations targeting financial crimes and corruption. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, she reviews the Foundation of New Era Philanthropy investigation, a $350 million charity Ponzi scheme perpetrated against unsuspecting nonprofit organizations, high profiled philanthropists, and beneficiary donors, which resulted in a 12-year prison sentence and multiple forfeitures. The case and Jerri Williams were featured on the CNBC show, American Greed, Confessions of a Con Man. She received a United States Attorney Award for Distinguished Service for her work on the New Era Philanthropy case, as well as two additional U.S. Attorney Awards for her work on an international advance fee scam, and a business to business telemarketing fraud. Toward the end of her FBI career, Jerri Williams was appointed as the spokesperson for the Philadelphia Division of the FBI, taking on the responsibility of educating and informing the media and public about the Bureau. Post-FBI retirement, Jerri served as the spokesperson and Director of Media Relations for SEPTA, Philadelphia’s public transportation provider. Both positions often placed her in the spotlight in front of local and national news media. Jerri Williams is the author of two crime novels. Her recently published novel, Greedy Givers, was inspired by the Foundation of New Era Philanthropy investigation discussed in this episode.

(I’m interviewed by Deana Marie, host of Twisted Philly Podcast. Thanks, Deana!)

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Retired agent Dan Reilly served with the FBI for 30 years, six as a photographer and technician in the FBI Laboratory and twenty-four as a Special Agent. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Dan Reilly reviews the case of con-man and rare documents thief, Charles Merrill Mount, a celebrated Portrait artist and art historian, who stole hundreds of historical manuscripts from the National Archives and the Library of Congress, including Civil War documents and three letters written by Abraham Lincoln. During his career, he worked on a variety of criminal cases, including Interstate Transportation of Stolen Property, property crimes, and helped start the FBI’s Safe Streets Task Force Program investigating violent drug gangs. Dan Reilly led the Evidence Response Team (ERT) at the Washington Field Office and provided extensive experience and training to others on crime scene examination. After his retirement from the FBI, Dan Reilly worked as a private consulting analyst with the High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) task force operations in the Mid-Atlantic region. Dan Reilly is currently an adjunct faculty member at George Mason University in the Criminology, Law and Society Department.

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Retired agent James Furry served in the FBI for 31 years, eleven as a professional support employee and twenty years as a special agent. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, James Furry reviews his Church of Love case. Donald Lowry and Pamela St. Charles were charged with 26 counts of mail fraud for operating the Church of Love, a romance scam perpetrated against 31,000 lonely male victims who were defrauded of $4.5 million in losses discovered during the four-year investigation. During his FBI support career, James Furry was assigned to a Special Support Group conducting surveillance on hostile Russian intelligence agents while serving in New Orleans and the Washington Field Office. During his agent career, most of his time was in the Newark Division working Organized Crime and supervising an Organized Crime Squad, a Crimes Against Children Squad and serving as the World Trade Center Command Post Supervisor. He was also a hostage negotiator, police instructor and taught foreign police schools in Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and the Ukraine. After his retirement from the FBI, Furry worked as an anti-money laundering consultant. He is the author of Fidelity, Bravery, & Integrity: My Story: The True Life and Career of a FBI Special Agent, a memoir about his FBI career that includes a chapter on the Church of Love. To learn more about him, you can visit his website jimfurry.com.

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Retired agent Gregory Coleman served with the FBI for more than 25 years. He specialized in investigating financial crimes, money laundering, and asset forfeiture. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Greg Coleman reviews the criminal investigation of Jordan Belfort and the brokerage firm Stratton Oakmont for securities fraud, stock manipulation, and money laundering. The case was chronicled in the Martin Scorsese movie, The Wolf of Wall Street, starring Leonardo DiCaprio. In the movie, Greg Coleman was portrayed by Kyle Chandler. During his Bureau career, Coleman was widely recognized as an anti-money laundering expert among his law enforcement colleagues and is a recipient of the Director’s Award (Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys) for Outstanding Contributions in Law Enforcement. Many of his investigations involved stock market manipulations where the proceeds were laundered through shell corporations and offshore bank accounts. Since his retirement, he has operated Coleman Worldwide Advisors, where he designs and delivers customized, highly interactive, live training related to the detection and prevention of money laundering and suspicious activity reporting.  The training incorporates actual real-life examples drawn from the experiences of Mr. Coleman and other law enforcement officers. Greg Coleman is also a frequent keynote speaker and guest lecturer discussing the Wolf of Wall Street investigation and more. He has spoken to audiences in 14 countries. To arrange for him to consult or speak, he can be contacted directly at 646-660-1010 or gregorycoleman2015 (at) gmail.com. You can find more information about him and Coleman Worldwide Advisors on Greg Coleman’s LinkedIn page.

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Retired agent Randy Wolverton served with the FBI for 28 years. During his Bureau career, Wolverton, a CPA, worked cases involving violent crime, white-collar crime, drugs, public corruption, domestic terrorism and health care fraud. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Randy Wolverton reviews a savings and loan fraud case that targeted real estate investor Leonard Pelullo. In spite of the testimony of LCN underboss Phillip Leonetti who admitted to brokering a disputed loan shark debt between Leonard Pelullo and a LCN protected loan shark, the case had to be tried four times before Leonard Pelullo’s final conviction was upheld, and he was sentenced to a 24-year prison term. Prior to retirement, Randy Wolverton was promoted to the Financial Crimes Section, Economic Crimes Unit at FBI Headquarters and was responsible for program management of corporate fraud, securities fraud, insurance fraud and mass-marketing fraud matters. After he retired from the FBI, he co-edited a book entitled “White Collar Crime – Core Concepts for Consultants and Expert Witnesses” published by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). Randy Wolverton currently continues to work for the FBI as a contract Asset Forfeiture Investigator.

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Retired agent Dale Miskell served in the FBI for 23 years. His assignments included the Sacramento Field Office, Washington Field Office, the Cyber Division’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, and the Birmingham Field Office. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Dale is interviewed about the Internet Crime Complaint Center, known as IC3 and reviews his Nigerian re-shipping fraud case where individuals were recruited to receive merchandise at their place of residence and repackage the items for shipment to Nigeria. Unbeknownst to them, the merchandise was purchased with fraudulent credit cards. Dale Miskell traveled to Lagos, Nigeria to train police officers to investigate re-shipping fraud and assisted in the first ever arrests and prosecution in Nigerian courts of on-line cyber scams. While at Birmingham, home base to more than 430 cleared defense contractors, Dale Miskell supervised the Cyber Crime Squad and developed an expertise in targeting and combatting the computer hacking processes of advanced persistent threat actors. He also established and led one of the FBI’s first Cyber-Counterintelligence Task Forces.

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