Retired agent Marc Ruskin served 27 years with the FBI. During his Bureau career, he spent more than 20 of those years as an undercover agent. Marc successfully infiltrated a New York Mafia crime family, a Chinese Malaysian heroin organization, a Wall Street trading exchange, right-wing terrorist groups, and worked on espionage cases. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Marc Ruskin reviews his false flag espionage undercover role posing as a French operative seeking to purchase uranium enrichment equipment that had been stolen from a U.S. Department of Energy facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. His undercover work in this case resulted in a former employee at the Oak Ridge Complex being sentenced to six years in prison. Marc Ruskin was awarded five Commendations from the Director of the FBI for his work. A native French and Spanish speaker, he has worked at several US Embassies including Paris, Madrid, and Buenos Aires. As an FBI certified police instructor, Marc has lectured at universities and law enforcement academies. Since his retirement from the FBI in 2012, he has divided his time between a law practice in New York and extended stays in Liaoning Province, China, where he writes and studies Mandarin. Marc Ruskin recently published The Pretender – My Life Undercover for the FBI, a true crime narrative about his undercover roles and the FBI’s undercover operations—the procedures, the successes, and the failure.

Keep Reading →

Retired agent Joe Wolfinger served nearly 30 years with the FBI. During his Bureau career, he rose through a variety of positions—serving as a squad supervisor, inspector, Special Agent in Charge (SAC), and lastly, as Assistant Director in Charge (ADIC) of the FBI Academy at Quantico, VA. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Joe Wolfinger is interviewed about his supervision of the counterintelligence squad in Norfolk, VA and the investigation of John Walker, a retired U.S. Navy chief warrant officer and communications specialist who sold secrets about American military codes to the Soviets for nearly 20 years. He also recruited his friend, brother and son and together they caused extensive damage to America’s national security. The John Walker spy ring has been described as the “most damaging Soviet spy ring in history. Walker pled guilty and was sentenced to life in prison. For those who want to learn more about the investigation, Joe Wolfinger recommends retired case agent Bob Hunter’s book Spy Hunter: Inside the FBI Investigation of the Walker Espionage Case. After retiring from the FBI, Wolfinger served pro bono for fourteen years as the executive director of the Major County Sheriff’s Association.

Keep Reading →

Retired agent Dr. Raymond Batvinis, Ph.D. served in the FBI for twenty-five years. He spent most of his career concentrating on counterintelligence and counterterrorism matters. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Ray Batvinis reviews the history of the FBI’s counterintelligence program and past and current investigations of Russian interference in U. S. policies. During his Bureau career, Ray Batvinis’ assignments included stints at the Washington Field Office and the Intelligence Division’s Training Unit at FBI headquarters. Later he served in the Baltimore Division as a Supervisory Special Agent where he was privileged to supervise espionage investigations. After his retirement, he earned a Ph.D. in American History from The Catholic University of America and currently works a historian and educator specializing in the discipline of counterintelligence as a function of statecraft. He has written two books on the history of the FBI’s counterintelligence program. The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence, examines the turbulent early years of the Bureau’s counterintelligence evolution and includes examples of past Russian interference. His latest book provides details about former Director J. Edgar Hoover and FBI Counterespionage during World War II. In addition to writing and researching, Dr. Batvinis operates FBIstudies.com, a website focused on the study of the FBI and other counterintelligence issues.

Keep Reading →

Retired agent Todd Hulsey served with the FBI for 15 and a half years. However, he has, in total, 21 years of federal law enforcement service. Prior to obtaining his law degree and joining the Bureau, Hulsey worked for five years as a special agent with the United States Customs Service, now known as Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Hulsey is interviewed regarding a nuclear weapons espionage case involving Pedro Leonardo Mascheroni and his wife Marjorie Mascheroni.  “Leo” Mascheroni was a theoretical physicist formerly employed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. The FBI discovered that he had made contact with a foreign country and had offered to sell his expertise and assistance to build a nuclear weapons program for that nation. Hulsey supervised the Albuquerque Division case and the agents, analysts and surveillance group members who gathered the evidence needed to prosecute the Mascheronis for espionage. They both agreed to plead guilty to illegally passing  nuclear weapons program documents which contained information derived from classified and restricted data. He was sentenced to five years and she to one year in prison. Post Bureau retirement, Todd Hulsey runs his own law practice and operates  X Fed Productions, an entertainment consulting firm providing technical advice in the areas of national intelligence, law enforcement, and military operations to authors, screenwriters, video game developers, producers, and directors.

Keep Reading →

Retired agent Todd Hulsey served with the FBI for 15 and a half years. However, he has, in total, 21 years of federal law enforcement service. Prior to obtaining his law degree and joining the Bureau, Hulsey worked for five years as a special agent with the United States Customs Service, now known as Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Hulsey is interviewed regarding a nuclear weapons espionage case involving Pedro Leonardo Mascheroni and his wife Marjorie Mascheroni.  “Leo” Mascheroni was a theoretical physicist formerly employed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. The FBI discovered that he had made contact with a foreign country and had offered to sell his expertise and assistance to build a nuclear weapons program for that nation. Hulsey supervised the Albuquerque Division case and the agents, analysts and surveillance group members who gathered the evidence needed to prosecute the Mascheronis for espionage. They both agreed to plead guilty to illegally passing  nuclear weapons program documents which contained information derived from classified and restricted data. He was sentenced to five years and she to one year in prison. Post Bureau retirement, Todd Hulsey runs his own law practice and operates  X Fed Productions, an entertainment consulting firm providing technical advice in the areas of national intelligence, law enforcement, and military operations to authors, screenwriters, video game developers, producers, and directors.

Keep Reading →

JERRI WILLIAMS iTUNES

Retired agent Dell Spry served in the FBI for twenty years. During his career, he primarily worked counterintelligence, counterespionage, and counterterrorism investigations. While assigned to FBIHQ, Dell was a member of the National Security Council Counterterrorism Working Group. He was liaison to the CIA Counterintelligence Center, Counterespionage Group and was the lead investigator for the FBI in the Aldrich Ames case. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Dell is interviewed about the two-year-long investigation where he, as the FBI case agent, along with a team of FBI and CIA personnel, was successful in identifying Ames as a KGB mole. Ames, who was directly responsible for the execution of several Soviet and Russian assets and operatives, was charged and convicted of espionage in 1994 and is serving a life sentence. Dell received the FBI Director’s Award for Excellence in a Counterintelligence Investigation and the CIA Director’s Meritorious Service Award for his efforts. Prior to retirement, Dell supervised a Counterintelligence squad in Atlanta, Georgia. Currently, as a consultant, Dell teaches an advanced course of instruction to novice and experienced FBI personnel on human intelligence (HUMINT) collection, intelligence tradecraft, and counterintelligence matters.

Keep Reading →

JERRI WILLIAMS iTUNES

Retired agent Mike Rochford served in the FBI for 30 years, five years as a clerical employee and Russian translator, and 25 as a special agent. Prior to his retirement, Mike was Section Chief of the Espionage Section. Based on his language skill, Mike worked Foreign Counter Intelligence (FCI) cases for most of his career. While assigned as a supervisor at FBI Headquarters and in the field, he oversaw such cases as Aldrich Ames and Earl Pitts, and worked to identity six unknown subjects, government spies the FBI and CIA had been for years trying to uncover. One of those “unsubs” was eventually identified as FBI agent Robert Hanssen. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Mike Rochford reviews the investigation of  Hanssen, considered the most damaging spy in FBI history. Mike recruited the source, a Russian agent of the KGB/SVR, who provided the information that led to Hanssen’s identification. For this effort, Mike received the National Intelligence Medal of Achievement from the CIA.

Keep Reading →