Show Notes:

Retired agent Denise Minor served nearly 29 years with the FBI. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review with Jerri Williams, Minor is interviewed about her extensive investigative experience working overseas primarily in various countries in Africa and in the United States utilizing her French language skills to communicate, interpret and translate during her career.  In addition to serving as the Legal Attaché or LEGAT in Rabat, Morocco, Minor was a French interpreter for the Protocol Office in support of FBI Director Louie Freeh and other FBI executives, deployed to Nairobi, Kenya to lead a small team with French language skills to conduct terrorism investigations in the Federal Islamic Republic of the Comoros Islands, deployed to Rwanda to investigate human rights violations and genocide and had numerous other assignments that took her to Yemen, Haiti and other French-speaking destinations around the world. Her state-side assignments, included leading a team of crime analysts at the Behavioral Analysis Unit, Violent Criminal Apprehension Program and serving as a leadership development program facilitator on the FBI Leadership Learning Delivery Team.  After retiring from the FBI, Minor, a licensed attorney and certified personal coach, opened her own leadership development consulting firm, MindSpring Metro DC, Inc.

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Myron Fuller served in the FBI for 30 years. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review with Jerri Williams, Fuller is interviewed about his undercover and case agent roles in the case code-named ABSCAM, which was actually a spin-off of Operation Fountain Pen (OPFOPEN), the largest investigation by the FBI conducted into the activities of white-collar criminals (Jim Wedick is interviewed about OPFOPEN in Episode 6). ABSCAM was originally initiated to investigate and penetrate white-collar crime and organized crime targets in the New York area. Specifically, it was begun as an undercover operation to infiltrate a conspiracy involving  members of organize crime attempting to purchase businesses, including a mortgage company, for fraudulent and criminal purposes. The sophisticated ABSCAM scenario featured a fictitious wealthy Lebanese businessman who wanted to funnel millions of dollars from the Middle-East into ventures in the United States.  Fuller and his undercover partner, agent John Hauss, represented that they worked for a consortium of foreign banks and had access to a $7 Million bank account. The scenario, with the cooperation of con man Mel Weinberg, allowed for the successful investigation and conviction of organized crime figures, con men, and ultimately, corrupt politicians. Fuller retired as the Special Agent in Charge (SAC) of the Honolulu Division.

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Retired Special Agent Jim McGee served in the FBI for nearly 21 years. This week on FBI Retired Case File Review with Jerri Williams, he is interviewed about being a member of the FBI Hostage Rescue Team (HRT), one of the world’s most elite counter-terrorism teams. McGee provides a first-hand account of his participation in the HRT’s first dynamic assault mission which resulted in the successful hostage rescue of nine. In 1991, a violent group of Cuban inmates in the Federal Correctional Institution in Talladega, Alabama, overpowered their guards and took hostages. The inmates demanded that they not to be deported back to Cuba. The HRT was called in and the hostages were rescued unharmed. For their efforts, Jim and the other HRT members were awarded the FBI Medal of Meritorious Achievement. McGee wrote a book about his experience—Phase Line Green—available by contacting McGee directly.

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I’m excited to be celebrating my 50th episode of FBI Retired Case File Review with Jerri Williams this week, along with the success of my crime novel Pay To Play. While producing and hosting my true crime – crime fiction podcast over the last year, I’ve conducted interviews with my retired FBI colleagues about the high-profiled cases they worked while on the job. And during almost every interview one of us comments about some aspect of the case or an investigative method that had been portrayed in books, TV and movies as a cliché or inaccurately. I noted at least ten (10) misconceptions about the FBI that were repeatedly discussed. Just as some attorneys don’t read or watch legal dramas and some doctors avoid medical shows and novels, for this special episode I’m joined by retired agent Bobby Chacon, a technical advisor for the TV show Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders for a lively discussion about why some FBI agents might not be reading that bestselling book series or watching that popular show depicting the FBI (In episode 8, I interviewed Bobby about working Jamaican drug gang cases and leading the FBI dive team).

Most people will never meet a FBI agent. The only connections they have with the FBI are the ones they make through books, TV, and movies, along with, of course, the news.

So, what if fictional portrayals of FBI agents are clichés or inaccurate? Does it really matter?

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Retired agent Todd Hulsey served with the FBI for 15 and a half years. However, he has, in total, 21 years of federal law enforcement service. Prior to obtaining his law degree and joining the Bureau, Hulsey worked for five years as a special agent with the United States Customs Service, now known as Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Hulsey is interviewed regarding a nuclear weapons espionage case involving Pedro Leonardo Mascheroni and his wife Marjorie Mascheroni.  “Leo” Mascheroni was a theoretical physicist formerly employed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. The FBI discovered that he had made contact with a foreign country and had offered to sell his expertise and assistance to build a nuclear weapons program for that nation. Hulsey supervised the Albuquerque Division case and the agents, analysts and surveillance group members who gathered the evidence needed to prosecute the Mascheronis for espionage. They both agreed to plead guilty to illegally passing  nuclear weapons program documents which contained information derived from classified and restricted data. He was sentenced to five years and she to one year in prison. Post Bureau retirement, Todd Hulsey runs his own law practice and operates  X Fed Productions, an entertainment consulting firm providing technical advice in the areas of national intelligence, law enforcement, and military operations to authors, screenwriters, video game developers, producers, and directors.

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Show Notes:

Retired agent Todd Hulsey served with the FBI for 15 and a half years. However, he has, in total, 21 years of federal law enforcement service. Prior to obtaining his law degree and joining the Bureau, Hulsey worked for five years as a special agent with the United States Customs Service, now known as Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Hulsey is interviewed regarding a nuclear weapons espionage case involving Pedro Leonardo Mascheroni and his wife Marjorie Mascheroni.  “Leo” Mascheroni was a theoretical physicist formerly employed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. The FBI discovered that he had made contact with a foreign country and had offered to sell his expertise and assistance to build a nuclear weapons program for that nation. Hulsey supervised the Albuquerque Division case and the agents, analysts and surveillance group members who gathered the evidence needed to prosecute the Mascheronis for espionage. They both agreed to plead guilty to illegally passing  nuclear weapons program documents which contained information derived from classified and restricted data. He was sentenced to five years and she to one year in prison. Post Bureau retirement, Todd Hulsey runs his own law practice and operates  X Fed Productions, an entertainment consulting firm providing technical advice in the areas of national intelligence, law enforcement, and military operations to authors, screenwriters, video game developers, producers, and directors.

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Show Notes:

Retired agent Richard “Dick” Marquise served with the FBI for 31 years. He is an expert in the fields of counter terrorism and crisis management, both as an investigator and as a manager. Marquise is interviewed about Pan Am Flight 103, blown out of the skies over Lockerbie, Scotland on December 21, 1988, four days before Christmas. Two hundred and seventy people were killed. Marquise was involved with the investigation from its inception and, after being named to lead the U.S. Task Force which included the FBI, Department of Justice and the Central Intelligence Agency, he managed the investigation through the return of indictments in 1991. He also played an active role through the court proceedings and in August 2001, with the successful resolution of the trial, he received the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service. Following the case, which had been code-named Scotbom, his Bureau career included the role of Special Agent in Charge (SAC) of the FBI’s Oklahoma City Division.  He has provided training to law enforcement officials all over the United States and internationally and has appeared on television and radio talk shows and has given hundreds of speeches all over the world on the topic of terrorism. In order to document the facts of the investigation, Marquise wrote Scotbom: Evidence and the Lockerbie Investigation a non-fiction account of the international terrorism case.

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