Retired agent Kevin Miles served nearly 23 years with the FBI. As the FBI’s first officially assigned full-time Special Agent bomb technician (SABT), he spent more than 17 years acquiring extensive experience in the field of improvised explosive devices and post-blast investigations. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Kevin Miles reviews the duties of a post-blast bomb technician processing and investigating explosive crime scenes, the bombing of Khobar Towers, Saudi Arabia in 1996, and the Maldives Al-Qaeda bombing in 2007. Kevin Miles is a past Executive Director of the International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators. He has travelled to 65 countries and 48 states, including multiple deployments to high threat areas such as Afghanistan and Pakistan, and has taught more than 9,000 students from all over the world on the intricacies involved with bombing investigations. In 2010, he was named as an FBI Master Special Agent Bomb Technician. He has published numerous articles and research papers on the topics above and has received numerous awards for his service to the first responder community. Currently, he is a lecturer at Eastern Kentucky University’s School of Safety, Security, and Emergency Management.

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Retired agent Herman Groman served in the FBI for 25 years. While in the Bureau, he specialized in working deep long-term undercover operations as an undercover agent in the areas of organized crime and narcotics. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, he reviews the case of FBI informant Richard Wershe Jr., also known as White Boy Rick, who, at the age of 17, was convicted of selling large quantities cocaine and sentenced to life in prison without parole. Later in his FBI career, Herman Groman was assigned to lead several high-profile public corruption investigations. He was also a team leader of one of the FBI Special Operations Groups (SOG). The specialized group conducted surveillances of major terrorist cell groups and their associates. Groman served as the director of security at a large Las Vegas casino/hotel for several years after retiring from the FBI. He is the author of Pigeon Spring, a crime novel featuring his fictionalized alter-ego former FBI agent Matt Steel, who coincidentally also takes a job as director of security at a major Las Vegas casino too.

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What began as a marketing tool to introduce myself to potential readers of my crime fiction, has morphed into a mission to assure the public of the integrity and independence of the FBI.

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Retired agent Michael “Bret” Hood served 25 years with the FBI. During his Bureau career, he worked complex financial crime, money laundering, corruption and major investment fraud cases. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Bret Hood reviews his investigation of David Mobley, Sr. and Maricopa Investments, a multi-million dollar hedge fund Ponzi scheme. Bret Hood, a federal-court certified expert in money laundering and financial crimes, has traveled the world for the FBI teaching public and private sector employees how to develop anti-fraud and anti-corruption programs. After retiring from the FBI, Bret became the director of 21st Century Learning & Consulting, LLC, where he offers blocks of instruction on a range of topics to include forensic accounting, executive leadership, crisis management, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and compliance programs. Bret Hood is the author of Eat More Ice Cream: A Succinct Leadership Lesson for Each Week of the Year and Get Off Your Horse! 52 Succinct Leadership Lessons from U.S. Presidents. You can learn more about Bret Hood at his website  21puzzles.com.

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Retired agent Gary Noesner served in the FBI for more than 30 years, four as a support employee and 26 as a special agent. During his Bureau career he was an investigator, instructor, and hostage negotiator. A significant focus of his career was directed toward investigating and negotiating numerous crisis incidents covering prison riots, right-wing militia standoffs, religious zealot sieges, terrorist embassy takeovers, airplane hijackings, and over 120 overseas kidnapping cases involving American citizens. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Gary Noesner reviews the importance of crisis negotiations and stalling for time and how these concepts were used during the Montana Freeman incident. When he retired he was the Chief of the FBI’s Crisis Negotiation Unit, Critical Incident Response Group, the first person to hold that position. He continues to consult independently and speaks at law enforcement conferences and corporate gatherings around the world. He has appeared on numerous television news programs and documentaries and has been interviewed in major publications addressing hostage negotiation, terrorism, and kidnapping. He has written a book about his career, Stalling for Time: My Life as an FBI Hostage Negotiator. The book serves as the basis for a six part mini-series on the 1993 Waco Siege incident that will air on the Paramount Network in January 2018. Gary can be contacted for presentations and speeches via his website.

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Retired agent Tym Burkey served 20 years with the FBI. While in the Cincinnati Division at the Dayton Resident Agency, he worked violent crime and domestic terrorism matters and was assigned a case targeting the Aryan Nations, which at the time was considered to be the most dangerous white supremacist group in the United States. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Tym Burkey reviews how his informant Dave Hall infiltrated the violent neo-Nazi organization. The intelligence gathered by Hall led to the disruption and dismantling of the Aryan Nations’ leadership. Later in his career, Tym Burkey began working counterintelligence investigations and was transferred to the Albuquerque Division where he was assigned to the Sandia National Laboratories and supervised the Albuquerque Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF). After retiring from the FBI, Tym Burkey co-wrote with Dave Hall a narrative account of their Aryan Nations case. Their book, Into the Devil’s Den: How an FBI Informant Got Inside the Aryan Nations and a Special Agent Got Him Out Alive, is a true-life thriller and a testament to bravery, dedication, and friendship. It’s also a timely reminder that America’s homegrown terrorists can be just as deadly as those from overseas.

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Retired agent Marc Ruskin served 27 years with the FBI. During his Bureau career, he spent more than 20 of those years as an undercover agent. Marc successfully infiltrated a New York Mafia crime family, a Chinese Malaysian heroin organization, a Wall Street trading exchange, right-wing terrorist groups, and worked on espionage cases. In this episode of FBI Retired Case File Review, Marc Ruskin reviews his false flag espionage undercover role posing as a French operative seeking to purchase uranium enrichment equipment that had been stolen from a U.S. Department of Energy facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. His undercover work in this case resulted in a former employee at the Oak Ridge Complex being sentenced to six years in prison. Marc Ruskin was awarded five Commendations from the Director of the FBI for his work. A native French and Spanish speaker, he has worked at several US Embassies including Paris, Madrid, and Buenos Aires. As an FBI certified police instructor, Marc has lectured at universities and law enforcement academies. Since his retirement from the FBI in 2012, he has divided his time between a law practice in New York and extended stays in Liaoning Province, China, where he writes and studies Mandarin. Marc Ruskin recently published The Pretender – My Life Undercover for the FBI, a true crime narrative about his undercover roles and the FBI’s undercover operations—the procedures, the successes, and the failure.

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